As we approach the Lenten season, you might wonder what to give up in this time of reflection. Popular items include caffeine, meat, sugar, television, and alcohol, among others. For some, social media has become an addiction (or, at a minimum, an ineffective use of time). This leads many people to do a tech fast for Lent and give up some forms of technology.

Since we’re still dealing with the impacts of COVID-19, completely giving up online technology is highly impractical. We don’t want to discourage people from watching online services if they’re unable to attend in-person. For those who use social media in their profession, giving that up for Lent could be an issue for their continued employment. Obviously, there are some significant obstacles to giving technology for Lent this year.

However, if you feel God leading you to limit your use of technology during Lent, you could limit your tech usage to work tasks only. You could continue to post from your church or business social media accounts while refraining from using personal accounts.

Perhaps another aspect of technology would make more sense for you to give up. That could include TV, texting, personal blogging, or any non-work use of technology. During the time you would normally watch a sitcom, you could listen to a sermon or stay on track with your Bible reading plan.

With all the upheaval we experienced in 2020, Lent in 2021 creates an excellent time to pause and reflect. Whether you give up social media, TV, texting, or something else for Lent, these 40 days are an opportunity to prepare to observe Easter and consider the direction God has for our lives.

Do you observe Lent? If so, what do you plan to give up for Lent? We’d love to see your comments.

Below is a list of articles we’ve published in the past on this topic:

Social Media Policies for Churches

7 Ways Your Church Can Use Social Media This Easter

5 Social Media Tips for Church Youth Leaders

7 Tech Hacks to Engage With Scripture More in the New Year

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