At Disney’s California Adventure there is a room called The Blue Sky Cellar. This room showcases the newest projects, dreams and plans that Disneyland is working on. They invite you to follow a project from the no holds barred “ Blue Sky” dreams of the Disney Imagineers to the final delivery and public unveiling.

Walking through the building is an incredible lesson in dreaming big. Each Disney project begins with a Blue Sky session. During these sessions the goal is to dream of the project possibilities, not get bogged down in the what if’s and budget concerns. There will be time to be realistic later, first they want to consider the creative options. Often the process of dreaming reveals solutions they never would have considered if they had started with the what if’s.

The church could learn a few things from this process.

When it comes to technology and creative visuals we approach projects with our list of what if’s and derail the process before it has even begun.

As you read through this list of creative options for your church video projector I encourage you to dream. You might find a solution in the process that makes the idea become reality.

Multi-Screen

This is the most common projection use in churches. While it is not new, it is still incredible effective. If you are just transitioning to using projectors or looking to expand it is a good place to start.

There are 2 main set-ups to consider

  • 2 Screens – Typically hung on the outside edges of the stage with matching content sent to each screen. This can help tremendously is you are in a wide building.
  • 2 + 1 Screens – This takes the previous design and adds a center screen to the mix. Most set ups give you the option to send different content to the outside and center screens. This way you can add a video feed, show slides or include sermon illustrations without having all the screen remain the same.

Triplewide

You can take the 2 + 1 Screen option from above and add a twist. Rather than 3 separate screens you align them edge to edge to form a panoramic screen.

Several options exist to blend the edges of the images together to complete the look. ProPresenter makes it easy by including it with their upgrade modules.

If you decide on this option, Triplewide content is available from TripleWideMedia, ShareFaith, Church Motion Graphics and more.

Alternate Angles

Add an extra screen or two and hang them at an angle or in portrait format. Tip your projector on its side to match and send matching textures and images (without live video) to the screens. Consider hanging them with pulleys so you can lower them into place during an event. While this isn’t mind blowing, the effect is powerful and can be set up in an afternoon.

Environmental Projection

The goal of Environmental Projection is to visually surround the viewer and draw them in. To accomplish this, you project still images and video on the walls, floor or building itself. It allows you to change the look and feel of your worship space to match the elements in your service.

Doing this well takes planning and direction. For examples of how its done and information about what’s needed visit VisualWorshiper and TripleWideMedia.

Mapped Design

As churches look for creative ways to enhance their worship space, stage design has grown exponentially. A creative way to connect stage pieces (free standing or hanging) and projection is with mapped design.

Tools like ProPresenter and MadMapper allow you to “map” where you do and don’t want to project. Once set up, you can recall the settings and create different projection looks.

Items you might consider “mapping” are…

  • Hanging Fabric
    • sheets
    • curtains
    • scrim
  • Stretched Fabric
  • Solid Surfaces
    • stage facings
    • hanging items

What is your “Blue Sky” dream for your church video projector? Which of these options can help make the idea become reality?